Ingrown Toenails – Need Solutions?

Ingrown Toenails – Need Solutions?

Ingrown Toenails - Need Solutions?

Ingrown Toenails - Need Solutions?

Ingrown toenail

Ingrown toenails can be painful to live with and sometime worse to have treated but that doesn’t need to be the way!

Our team has oodles of experience removing painful ingrown toenail and to the delight of patients they are often surprised at how painless the experience is!

Ye,s we use Local anaesthetic when requested. Just ask our team!

People walk away, pain free after the procedure.

Most patients DO NOT need surgery! Even if they’ve been told that they do by other well meaning practitioners.

If you need surgery YES our team have extensive experience undertaking this surgery and can advise you of how to proceed.

Need more information? See our link below. Or call us on 96732987

I hope that helps. Make sure you head to our information below and our links to look up more information about fungal nail, heel pain, foot types, and other sports injuries. We look forward to making you happy, healthy and active.

Have you looked at our Ingrown Toenail Page?

Want more information? That's fantastic! There's stacks of videos that we've made. Look down below. There's most likely a link there, or check us out on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, etc., all the normal socials because we've got stacks of educational videos on heel pain and all the other conditions that we look after. Thanks and stay happy, healthy and active.

ABOUT DR BRENDEN BROWN

Founder of A Step Ahead Foot + Ankle Care in Sydney, and former president of the Australasian Podiatry Council, Dr Brenden Brown (A.K.A Dr Foot) is a wealth of knowledge on how to take care of your feet, including how to find the best shoes.

Follow him on social media:
 instagram.com/askdrfoot
 facebook.com/podiatristsydney
 twitter.com/AStepAheadFAC

* No medical treatment can guarantee 100% success. Registered medical and health professions in Australia are by law not allowed to guarantee success. This comes as a result of all human bodies reacting differently to treatments. Patients should thoroughly consider all treatment options available to them.

4 hacks for a successful warm up

4 hacks for a successful warm up

Dr Brenden Brown, sports podiatrist from Sydney-based A Step Ahead Foot + Ankle Care, says, “Cold muscle is less pliable which means it has to work harder to accommodate a given load and will be more resistant to sudden stretch. Less pliable muscle tissue is also more susceptible to overuse injuries so never underestimate the importance of warming up (correctly!).”

He provides 4 steps to a successful warm up

4 hacks for a successful warm up - 1

4 hacks for a successful warm up

#1 Set aside adequate time

Warming up prepares the body for sport by improving blood flow to the different areas, increasing the muscle temperature and making muscles more pliable. The result – less likelihood of injury!

“The warm-up routine needn’t take half an hour, but it should take a good 10-15 minutes,” says Dr Brenden.

4 hacks for a successful warm up - 2

#2 WALK, before you run!

All too often players arrive at their sports training session and the coach shouts, “Right, go for a run”. This is way too much sudden change for the muscles.

No matter what sport or activity, players can begin their warm-up by walking.

Dr Brenden advocates the ‘Two footy fields or eight netball courts’ approach to warming up…

  1. Start slowly walking around the outside of 2 footy fields, end-to-end or side-to-side. For court sports, this equates to approximately 8 laps of the court!
  2. As you walk further SLOWLY pick up the pace. “NEVER get to a run!”
  3. You will do 2 complete laps of the 2 fields or 8 laps of the courts.
  4. NOW you are ready to look at further warm up exercises and maybe that coach’s run!

4 hacks for a successful warm up - 3

#3 Perform activity-specific warm ups and training

Let’s take netball as an example, there’s little point in netballers shooting hoops and running straight up and down the court in their warm-up and training sessions. It’s far better to do side-to-side jumps, high jumps and lands, as well as cutting movements. This is much more specific to what they’ll likely to be doing on the court and will help ensure the appropriate muscles are warmed up.

Same goes for footy, rugby or any other sport for that matter; make sure the warm up exercises you perform are relevant to what you’ll be doing on the field or pitch.

4 hacks for a successful warm up - 4

#4 Should you really stretch before sport?

This is an important question, particularly as when you stretch out a muscle and hold it there (static stretching) you can push the tissue past where it needs to go, which could do more harm than good!

According to the experts, stretching is NOT PROVEN to help prevent injury, curb muscle soreness after exercise or improve your performance.

In his paper ‘Does stretching improve performance? A systematic and critical review of the literature’1 sports medicine physician Ian Shrier writes, “An acute bout of stretching does not improve force or jump height, and the results for running speed are contradictory. Regular stretching improves force, jump height, and speed, although there is no evidence that it improves running economy.”

Another article2 states: “Static stretching before exercise can weaken performance, such as sprint speed, in studies. The most likely reason is that holding the stretch tires out your muscles.”

It goes on to say, “you should warm up by doing dynamic stretches, which are like your workout but at a lower intensity.”

Dr Brenden explains, “Dynamic stretches differ from the norm in that they stretch the body fluidly through an entire range of motions. Instead of holding the muscle in a stationary stretched-out position, you move gradually through the movement. This also allows you to make the stretching movement more specific to the sport you’ll be playing.”

Related:

4 hacks for staying injury free this winter sports season

Warming up for sport—why bother?

Sources:
  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15377965
  2. https://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/features/how-to-stretch#1
Ingrown toenail surgery—is it right for you?

Ingrown toenail surgery—is it right for you?

Ingrown toenail surgery—is it right for you? - 1

Ingrown toenail surgery—is it right for you?

What does ingrown toenail surgery involve?

Surgery to address an ingrown toenail (onychocryptosis) involves removing the bothersome nail and applying a chemical to prevent the nail from growing back.

In some instances it may be necessary or most beneficial to remove a small section of nail at one or both sides, but on the odd occasion the entire nail (total nail avulsion) will be removed.

It is a quick and simple procedure than is essentially pain free as it is performed with an injection of local anaesthetic.

Following surgery the toe is dressed and generally speaking there is little, if any, pain or discomfort. You may expect some throbbing that night or discomfort but this is most often managed well with paracetamol.

When is toenail surgery the best option?

Ingrown toenail surgery should not be considered first-line treatment for an ingrown toenail. It can be considered when:

  • Other non-surgical methods have been exhausted
  • The nail is involuted or curved
  • Ingrown toenail is problematic, painful or recurring
  • You understand the implications and potential complication of surgery
  • You have discussed any concerns with your podiatrist

What are the advantages of clinic-based toenail surgery?

  • No time in hospital
  • No Sutures / stitches required – all completed under the nail plate
  • No more recurrent ingrown toenails
  • Pain free
  • Minimal time off work
  • Reduced episodes of infection and lesions (weeping, bleeding)
  • In the majority of cases, ingrown toenail surgery is very successful

Dr Brenden Brown, podiatrist and founder of A Step Ahead Foot + Ankle Care, says, “Nail surgeries are not new for podiatrists; we perform them on a regular basis. It is part of our training at University so we are well versed in this surgery. It is carried out in our clinic and, due to our high level of training, is a fairly simple procedure.

“I often describe this surgery as ‘relatively pain free’. It is wrong to say any surgical procedure is ‘completely pain free’ but as procedures go our patients report very little, if any, pain.  In fact, patients are frequently surprised at just how pain free it actually is!

“This procedure can certainly be of benefit and is recommended for patients who have a history of infection or recurrent ingrown toenails. It’s also very helpful for patients with involuted or very curved nails and toenails with areas that seem to catch the skin on the side of the nail.

“Patients often suffer from an ingrown toenail for many years with little idea where to go to for help.

“The days of painful surgeries with patients regularly experience nail re-growth are gone. It’s also important to remember that what you see on YouTube and other social media sites is often the ‘most horrible’ and ‘most atrocious’. If it wasn’t so gruesome you probably wouldn’t have been so motivated to watch and it likely would have got the “views” it did!

Related articles:

5 hacks to keep ingrown toenails at bay

ABOUT US

A Step Ahead Foot + Ankle Care is one of Sydney’s leading foot and ankle clinics. Principal podiatrist and founder of A Step Ahead Dr Brenden Brown (AKA Dr Foot) has been taking care of people’s feet for more than 20 years.

With a background in sports medicine and having served as a former president of the Australasian Podiatry Council, Brenden is a wealth of information when it comes to foot and ankle care.

Got a question? Check out our Instagram profile #AskDrFoot

Tune into our Facebook page for regular live videos and updates on the latest foot and ankle advice from the experts.

5 hacks to keep ingrown toenails at bay

5 hacks to keep ingrown toenails at bay

5 hacks to keep ingrown toenails at bay - 1

5 hacks to keep ingrown toenails at bay

What causes an ingrown toenail?

Ingrown toenail (known medically as onychocryptosis) is a condition where the edge of the toenail (most commonly on the big toe) pierces or catches on the skin as it grows up.

MYTH: Nails only grow upwards they do not on any occasion grow outwards towards the side.

There are several causes of an ingrown toenail but probably the most widespread is poor toenail-trimming technique. Cutting down the side of the nail is a major no-no. Why? Because even the smallest spike of nail can grow up and penetrate, or get caught on, the skin.

The ingrown slither of nail acts like a splinter; the skin around it thinks it’s a foreign body and becomes inflamed and infected.

5 hacks to keep ingrown toenails at bay - 2

5 hacks to prevent ingrown toenails

  1. Clip with caution. Trim toenails straight across. DO NOT cut down the sides of the nail and refrain from cutting nails too short
  2. Refrain from ripping the nails down the sides. We have all done this! You cut but you can’t get that last bit of nail, so you abandon the clippers and rip the last piece down the side. This leaves a sharp spike, which may not be painful now but in following days it will grow upwards and catch on the skin piercing it creating the subsequent infection and PAIN!
  3. Ditch footwear that is too tight or constricts the toes from moving. This can push the nail into the skin causing irritation and infection
  4. Steer clear of unqualified people offering to remove ingrown toenails. While this may sound somewhat self-serving, there are an increasing number of nail salons offering to perform this sort of work. Removing the nail breaks the skin barrier, which can easily become infected. Whilst your podiatrist makes it look easy that is because it’s what they have been trained to do and complete on a regular basis.
  5. Adhere to best-practice foot care by keeping feet clean and dry to avoid weak, splitting nail and fungal infections.

How to fix ingrown toenails — at home

To treat an ingrown toenail at home you can try: Cutting the nails straight across and applying an antibiotic cream to help reduce the risk of infection and subsequent inflammation. You can also use a nail file to round the corners!

MYTH: Cutting a V in your toenail will not make it grow inwards; nails only grow upwards. While the V may look like it’s closing in, this is an illusion as you are trimming the top of the V, making it appear like the V is getting smaller over time.

Applying a small piece of cotton wool between the ingrown nail and the skin can help life the nail, hopefully clearing it and preventing the nail from piercing the skin again.

Avoid wearing high heels, pointed or tight fitting shoes as these can place pressure on the affected area, potentially delaying healing.

The professional approach

Dr Brenden Brown, podiatrist and founder of A Step Ahead Foot + Ankle Care, says, “If the toenail turns into a monster and becomes red, angry or infected—It’s definitely time to seek professional advice.

“A podiatrist can easily treat an ingrown toenail by removing the troublesome spike of nail. In most cases this is a quick (takes minutes) and simple procedure, which is completely painless.

“Following the removal of the nail spile, the toenail area is cleaned and, if infection has been present, the toe will be dressed.

“In extreme cases, toenail surgery may be required. This will generally only happen if the patient has a repeated history of recurrent in grown nails or if the nails shape means it requires removal of that section, such as when it is involuted or excessively curved.

“It is more rare than most people think to remove a whole nail as we can manage these well conservatively”

Related articles:

Ingrown toenail surgery—is it right for you?

ABOUT US

A Step Ahead Foot + Ankle Care is one of Sydney’s leading foot and ankle clinics. Principal podiatrist and founder of A Step Ahead Dr Brenden Brown (AKA Dr Foot) has been taking care of people’s feet for more than 20 years.

With a background in sports medicine and having served as a former president of the Australasian Podiatry Council, Brenden is a wealth of information when it comes to foot and ankle care.

Got a question? Check out our Instagram profile #AskDrFoot

Tune into our Facebook page for regular live videos and updates on the latest foot and ankle advice from the experts.

Warming up for sports—why bother?

Warming up for sports—why bother?

Warming up for sports—why bother? - 1

Warming up for sports—why bother?

“Warm-ups have the ability to help prepare the muscles for activity. However, what’s changed is that we now question many ‘traditional’ warm-up methods; evidence suggests that static stretching probably shouldn’t be part of most people’s warm up routine,” says founder of A Step Ahead Foot + Ankle Care Dr Brenden Brown.

“The days of a few quick hamstring stretches followed by a run around the field are long gone. Modern warm-ups are more cleverly designed; they need to be more specific to the sport we’re playing or the activity we’re embarking on.”

Warming up for sports—why bother? - 2

The benefits of warm-ups

Preparing the body for participation in sports by warming up, will enhance the maximal performance and reduce the risk of injury! This is a sentence I often find myself repeating over and over again to my young patients,” says Dr Brenden.

“The Netball World Cup was a great example of how warming up is directly linked to injury prevention and optimum performance. The public was able to see first hand the amount of time the best teams in the world spend on warming up before games.

Warming up improves blood flow to the heart, increases the muscle temperature and makes muscles more pliable.

“Cold or less pliable or elastic muscle works harder to accommodate a given load and will be more resistant to sudden stretch.  Less pliable muscle tissue is also more susceptible to overuse injuries.

“No matter what the sport or activity is, players can begin their warm-up by walking a couple of laps of the soccer field or court. Increase the pace on the second lap to turn it in to a brisk walk but don’t jog or run.

“As you walk you’re infusing the tissue and muscles with blood to gently warm up the body. At the end of a gentle warm-up your muscles are ready to be used.”

The ‘right’ kind of netball warm-up

“I continue to see kids doing two types of warm-ups. They either run from one end of the netball court to the other and that’s it or they go back to the classic—are dare I say outdated—routine involving calf stretches, hamstring stretches, touching toes and throwing the ball into the hoop.

“If we take netball as an example, the warm-ups need to be specific to the sport. Most netballers need to be doing lots of side-to-side movements, twists, turning and cutting movements.

“This might include doing the grapevine across the court, side-to-side stepping, moving up to side-to-side hoping and jumping. Standing still, pointing the toe and rotating the ankle is also useful as part of a warm-up.

“The warm-up routine needn’t take half an hour but it should take approximately 10-15 minutes.”

Warming up for sports—why bother? - 3

To stretch or not to stretch—this is the question!

Dr Brenden explains, “By stretching out a muscle and holding it there (static stretching) we’re pushing the tissue past where it needs to go, which could do more harm than good.

“This type of stretching is also not sports specific. However, stretching doesn’t always mean stretching out a muscle and holding it there.

Dynamic stretches differ from the norm in that they stretch the body through movement. So instead of holding the muscle in a static stretched-out position, you move gradually through the movement.

“At best, I’d call this a light stretch. There should be no risk of over-stretching the muscles.”

8 reasons to warm up

  • Increases range of movement
  • Warms up muscles in prepares for activity
  • Increases fluid production to lubricate joints
  • Triggers the neural pathways between your brain and your muscles
  • Improves reaction and response time
  • Reduces risk of injury
  • Potential to improve performance
  • Helps improve recovery time
Related articles:

Winter sports’ greatest enemy….ankle sprain

Your guide to rock-solid ankle stability

A Step Ahead Foot + Ankle Care is one of Sydney’s leading foot and ankle clinics. Principal podiatrist and founder of A Step Ahead Dr Brenden Brown (AKA Dr Foot) has been taking care of people’s feet for more than 20 years.

With a background in sports medicine and having served as a former president of the Australasian Podiatry Council, Brenden is a wealth of information when it comes to foot and ankle care.